Articles tagged "cloud"

Reset The Net with the Upgraded Simple Secure Storage Service

“Reset The Net!” is a broad coalition of many businesses, organizations, and individuals. We're empowering people to protect themselves on the Internet by using end-to-end encryption.

Least Authority is a team of computer security professionals dedicated to providing freedom-compatible storage. For us that means end-to-end-encryption and Free and Open Source code. Always.

In support of “Reset The Net!” we have upgraded our Secure Simple Storage Service (S4), reduced the price by 50%, and included unlimited personal data storage in the cloud.

S4 uses the Least Authority File System, a technology designed with user security in mind, and built from the ground up to provide that security as well as we know how.

Such tools allow the user to store data on the Internet without any third party (even us!) breaching the confidentiality or integrity of the data. This keeps the power where it belongs, in the hands of the user.

We are pleased to announce S4 as a command-line utility, and we are presently developing a Dropbox-esque friendly file-syncing utility named “Magic Folders”.

If you're comfortable with the command line, you can take part now with a free 30-day trial and continued service at half the previous price. By using Least Authority's secure cloud storage service, you're becoming a supporter of the further development of the Free and Open Source crypto system, and you're getting a great tool right now for your own use.

This video demonstrates its use:



Does that look like the product for you?



Not familiar with the command line? Don't worry we have a product in the works for you! Give us your email and we'll let you know when Magic Folders is ready!


Least Authority Performs Security Audit For SpiderOak

Our mission at LeastAuthority is to bring verifiable end-to-end security to everyone.

As part of that mission, in addition to operating the S4 simple secure storage service, we also run a security consulting business. We LeastAuthoritarians have extensive experience in security and cryptography, and other companies pay us to analyze the security of their protocols and software.

Almost all of our consulting clients are making Free and Open Source software which protects user freedoms and works against censorship. It is wonderful that in this day and age we can get paid to work on software in the public interest.

One of our clients is SpiderOak, a company who, like LeastAuthority, sells cloud storage with end-to-end encryption. They didn't hire us to evaluate the security of their current storage product (that would be a big job!), but instead to do a limited, two-week long, security audit of their new Crypton.io framework.

It was a fun project because we got to learn some of the details of the Crypton.io design and implementation. We came away with a favorable impression of the professionalism and good engineering practices of the SpiderOak team. Crypton.io is all Free and Open Source software, and it is designed for real, end-to-end security, which is part of why we wanted to take the job.

Today SpiderOak has published the security auditing report. We'd like to thank them for producing Crypton.io, subjecting it to this kind of independent review, and publishing the complete results. That's the right way to do things!

The next security audit that we performed, was for the Cryptocat secure chat app. We expect the report from that to also be published soon. Stay tuned!


S4 on LinuxBSDos.com

Yesterday LinuxBSDos.com featured S4 and LAFS in an article on secure, distributed cloud storage. We had a bit of a quibble with the article's first line, though:

Looking for a solution to give you an edge in the ongoing struggle between you and the authorities over the privacy of your data?

It's important to us to note that S4 and LAFS are not only meant to thwart mass government surveillance. We seek to protect against access by the unauthorized, not merely "the authorities". That means individual crackers, criminal organizations, corporate rivals, or non-PRISM-affiliated foreign governments just as much as the NSA! Least Authority is pro-security across the board.

There is no way that one could build an effective anti-government security system without excluding those other threats as well. Similarly, if law enforcement is authorized to see the data, then hackers also can see the data.



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